Profile of Senior CWI Fellow Gabby Hornbeck

By Emily Weinick ‘13

“I came here for the history department and the conservatory, but I didn’t know much about the Civil War,” admitted CWI fellow Gabby Hornbeck. Four years later, Hornbeck has interned at two National Military Parks on Civil War battlefields, has reenacted in battles as a civilian and soldier with the Pennsylvania College Guard, and is actively involved with other Civil War groups on campus including the Civil War Club, the Civil War Theme House, and the Civil War Institute.
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Returning the Landscape to its Battlefield Appearance: Part Three of Three

By Tricia Runzel ’13, Gabby Hornbeck ’13, and Becky Oakes ’13

Within the last couple of years, the Gettysburg Cyclorama Building has become a point of tension for Gettysburg buffs across the country. After a long battle, the National Park Service has recently begun demolishing the structure. In an effort to better understand the controversy over the fate of the Cyclorama Building, three Civil War Institute Fellows have completed a three part video series explaining both sides of the argument and why the decision was ultimately made to return the landscape to its 1863 appearance.

Click below for our final installment of this series, “Returning the Landscape to its Battlefield Appearance.” If you missed parts one and two, check out “The Cyclorama Land in July 1863” and “Mission 66 and the Creation of the Cyclorama Building.”

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Mission 66 and the Creation of the Cyclorama Building: Part Two of Three

By Tricia Runzel ’13, Gabby Hornbeck ’13, and Becky Oakes ’13

Within the last couple of years, the Gettysburg Cyclorama Building has become a point of tension for Gettysburg buffs across the country. After a long battle, the National Park Service has recently begun demolishing the structure. In an effort to better understand the controversy over the fate of the Cyclorama Building, three Civil War Institute Fellows have completed a three part video series explaining both sides of the argument and why the decision was ultimately made to return the landscape to its 1863 appearance.

Click below for the second installment of this series, “Mission 66 and the Creation of the Cyclorama Building.” Check back in the coming weeks for the conclusion of this series, “Returning the Landscape to its Battlefield Appearance.”

Continue reading “Mission 66 and the Creation of the Cyclorama Building: Part Two of Three”

The Cyclorama Land in July 1863: Part One of Three

By Tricia Runzel ’13, Gabby Hornbeck ’13, and Becky Oakes ’13

Within last couple of years, the Gettysburg Cyclorama Building has become a point of tension for Gettysburg buffs across the country. After a long battle, the National Park Service has recently begun demolishing the structure. In an effort to better understand the controversy over the fate of the Cyclorama Building, three Civil War Institute Fellows have completed a three part video series explaining both sides of the argument and why the decision was ultimately made to return the landscape to its 1863 appearance.

Here is the first installment of this series, “The Cyclorama Land in July 1863.” Check back in the coming weeks for parts two and three, “Mission 66 and the Creation of the Cyclorama Building” and “Returning the Landscape to its Battlefield Appearance.”

Continue reading “The Cyclorama Land in July 1863: Part One of Three”

Treason or Slander?

by Gabby Hornbeck, ’13 On July 4th, 1863, Henry J. Stahle, editor of the Gettysburg Compiler was arrested and sent to Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland. He was accused of “copperhead treason” in the form of informing a “rebel colonel” during the…

By Gabby Hornbeck ’13

On July 4th, 1863, Henry J. Stahle, editor of the Gettysburg Compiler was arrested and sent to Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland. He was accused of “copperhead treason” in the form of informing “a rebel colonel” during the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg.(1) In speaking of his discussion with General Morris upon his forced return to Fort McHenry in late July of 1863, Stahle wrote,

We suspected that some fiendish political opponent was at the bottom of it, and we could afford to suffer more yet in order to discover him–and hoped Gen. Morris had now evidence enough to enable us to place our finger upon the very man. We asked him why he ordered our return. He replied, ‘a letter from Gettysburg.’ We asked to see it, and it was produced. There it was!–in the hand-writing of and signed by D. McCONAUGHY (2)

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