Returning the Landscape to its Battlefield Appearance: Part Three of Three

By Tricia Runzel ’13, Gabby Hornbeck ’13, and Becky Oakes ’13

Within the last couple of years, the Gettysburg Cyclorama Building has become a point of tension for Gettysburg buffs across the country. After a long battle, the National Park Service has recently begun demolishing the structure. In an effort to better understand the controversy over the fate of the Cyclorama Building, three Civil War Institute Fellows have completed a three part video series explaining both sides of the argument and why the decision was ultimately made to return the landscape to its 1863 appearance.

Click below for our final installment of this series, “Returning the Landscape to its Battlefield Appearance.” If you missed parts one and two, check out “The Cyclorama Land in July 1863” and “Mission 66 and the Creation of the Cyclorama Building.”

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Mission 66 and the Creation of the Cyclorama Building: Part Two of Three

By Tricia Runzel ’13, Gabby Hornbeck ’13, and Becky Oakes ’13

Within the last couple of years, the Gettysburg Cyclorama Building has become a point of tension for Gettysburg buffs across the country. After a long battle, the National Park Service has recently begun demolishing the structure. In an effort to better understand the controversy over the fate of the Cyclorama Building, three Civil War Institute Fellows have completed a three part video series explaining both sides of the argument and why the decision was ultimately made to return the landscape to its 1863 appearance.

Click below for the second installment of this series, “Mission 66 and the Creation of the Cyclorama Building.” Check back in the coming weeks for the conclusion of this series, “Returning the Landscape to its Battlefield Appearance.”

Continue reading “Mission 66 and the Creation of the Cyclorama Building: Part Two of Three”

The Cyclorama Land in July 1863: Part One of Three

By Tricia Runzel ’13, Gabby Hornbeck ’13, and Becky Oakes ’13

Within last couple of years, the Gettysburg Cyclorama Building has become a point of tension for Gettysburg buffs across the country. After a long battle, the National Park Service has recently begun demolishing the structure. In an effort to better understand the controversy over the fate of the Cyclorama Building, three Civil War Institute Fellows have completed a three part video series explaining both sides of the argument and why the decision was ultimately made to return the landscape to its 1863 appearance.

Here is the first installment of this series, “The Cyclorama Land in July 1863.” Check back in the coming weeks for parts two and three, “Mission 66 and the Creation of the Cyclorama Building” and “Returning the Landscape to its Battlefield Appearance.”

Continue reading “The Cyclorama Land in July 1863: Part One of Three”

Gettysburg College: A Memorial Landmark

by Tricia Runzel, ’13 As a Gettysburg College student it is impossible to escape the Civil War in my daily life. Surrounded by battlefield, including portions of our own campus, walking on the same ground as the soldiers, and working in buildings …

By Tricia Runzel ’13

As a Gettysburg College student it is impossible to escape the Civil War in my daily life. Surrounded by battlefield, including portions of our own campus, walking on the same ground as the soldiers, and working in buildings that witnessed the tragedy of the Battle of Gettysburg makes the war inescapable. The college’s role in the battle has become famous in campus lore for its use as an observation point and hospital during and after the battle. Still standing Pennsylvania Hall, known as the College Edifice at the time of the battle, once housed the wounded and dying on campus.

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Courtesy of Special Collections, Musselman Library, Gettysburg College.

Continue reading “Gettysburg College: A Memorial Landmark”

“I’m not embarrassed. Are you?”: The friendship of Ulysses S. Grant and Mark Twain

by Tricia Runzel, ’13 ???And in still one more cradle, somewhere under the flag, the future illustrious Commander-in-Chief of the American armies is so little burdened with his approaching grandeurs and responsibilities as to be giving his whole str…

By Tricia Runzel ’13

“And in still one more cradle, somewhere under the flag, the future illustrious Commander-in-Chief of the American armies is so little burdened with his approaching grandeurs and responsibilities as to be giving his whole strategic mind at this moment to trying to find out some way to get his big toe into his mouth – an achievement which, meaning no disrespect, the illustrious guest of this evening turned his entire attention to some fifty-six years ago; and if the child is but a prophecy of the man, there are mighty few who will doubt that he succeeded.” – Mark Twain, 1879 Reunion of the Army of the Tennessee

With those words, Mark Twain concluded his toast entitled “The Babies.” Silence descended on the Chicago ballroom where the reunited Union soldiers of the Army of the Tennessee held their collective breath as they looked for the reaction of the “illustrious guest” of honor – General Ulysses S. Grant. Both then and now, the former Union general and President of the United States was seen as a man with carefully controlled emotions.

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